D-Day……Part 1

December 8, 2009

6th June 1944:

In November, 1943, Joseph Stalin, Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt met together in Teheran, Iran, to discuss military strategy and post-war Europe. Ever since the Soviet Union had entered the war, Stalin had been demanding that the Allies open-up a second front in Europe. Churchill and Roosevelt argued that any attempt to land troops in Western Europe would result in heavy casualties. Until the Soviet’s victory at Stalingrad in January, 1943, Stalin had feared that without a second front, Germany would defeat them.

Stalin, who always favoured an offensive strategy, believed that there were political, as well as military reasons for the Allies’ failure to open up a second front in Europe. Stalin was still highly suspicious of Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt and was worried about them signing a peace agreement with Adolf Hitler. The foreign policies of the capitalist countries since the October Revolution had convinced Stalin that their main objective was the destruction of the communist system in the Soviet Union. Stalin was fully aware that if Britain and the USA withdrew from the war, the Red Army would have great difficulty in dealing with Germany on its own.

At Teheran, Joseph Stalin reminded Churchill and Roosevelt of a previous promise of landing troops in Western Europe in 1942. Later they postponed it to the spring of 1943. Stalin complained that it was now November and there was still no sign of an allied invasion of France. After lengthy discussions it was agreed that the Allies would mount a major offensive in the spring of 1944.

General Dwight Eisenhower was put in charge of what became known as Operation Overlord. Eisenhower had the task of organizing around a million combat troops and two million men involved in providing support services.

The plan, drawn up by George Marshall, Dwight Eisenhower, Bernard Montgomery, Omar Bradley, Bertram Ramsay, Walter Bedell-Smith, Arthur Tedder and Trafford Leigh-Mallory, involved assaults on five beaches west of the Orne River near Caen (codenamed Sword, Juno, Gold, Omaha and Utah) by the British 2nd Army and the American 1st Army. Follow-up forces included the Canadian 1st Army and the American 3rd Army under Lt. General George Patton.

Juno was assigned to the Canadian Army. Canada contributed 110 ships to the invading force, 14,000 troops, including paratroopers, and 15 RCAF squadrons of fighters and fighter-bombers. It is estimated that Canada contributed about 10 percent of the D-Day invading force.

The invasion was preceded by a massive aerial bombardment of German communications. This resulted in the destruction of virtually every bridge over the Seine.

On 6th June, 1944, 2,727 ships sailed to the Normandy coast and on the first day landed 156,000 men on a front of thirty miles. It was the largest and most powerful armada that has ever sailed.

The Allied invasion was faced by 50 divisions of the German Army under General Erwin Rommel. At Omaha, steep cliffs favoured the defenders and the US Army suffered 2,500 casualties.

The Allies also sent in three airborne divisions, two American and one British, to prepare for the main assault by taking certain strategic points and by disrupting German communications. Of the 23,000 airborne troops, 15,500 were Americans and of these, 6,000 were killed or seriously wounded.

Over the next couple of days 156,215 troops were landed from sea and air in Normandy, at a cost of some 10,300 casualties.

Soldiers waiting to be parachuted in France (6th June, 1944)

Soldiers waiting to be parachuted in France (6th June, 1944)

And the rest is history……..listen closely to the words of “Say Goodbye To It All” by Chris de Burgh……study the photo above closely, imagine what they imagine……think their thoughts……. and it will bring a tear to your eye……if it doesn’t you are a sad, lost, and empty soul…..Fox.

First half of 1974…..still in the Workshops…..but only just

It was around about this time that I discovered I had an extreme fear of heights and anything to do with ladders, scaffolding, or ropes that had to be climbed.  Previously I had worked at heights and although experiencing a feeling of being drawn to the edge of whatever I was on top of at the time I seemed to cope.  Suddenly that all changed and I began avoiding any task that involved taking my feet off the ground except to sit on a bar stool or get into bed .

I was to find that this phobia would haunt me many times in the years to come, but somehow I managed to defeat it through sheer single-mindedness to complete the mission or simply a sense of pride in front of my Muckers.

My last months before my National Service was due to begin were spent in the Diesel Shop (part of the Erecting Shop) where our diesel locomotives were repaired, serviced, and armoured-up against explosive devices placed on the tracks or a small arms ambush by the Gooks.  Many of these attacks occurred, especially down the Rutenga/Beit Bridge way.  The diesels were used in those areas where steam was not practical due to a lack of water for their ever thirsty boilers.  From my recollections I do not recall any steam locos being attacked by the Gooks…..they seemed to take great delight in shooting/blowing up our diesels though…….maybe because there was a lot of nice smoke and flames generated by the fuel firing up.

Working in the Diesel Shop was a kind of prestige job actually.  You didn’t just get posted to the Diesel Shop….oh no.  You had to graduate by serving time in the noisy-sooty-greasy-oily steam loco shop and dead meat wagon shop first.  I think that one of the reasons for this was that compared to other parts of the workshop complex the Diesel Shop was eerily semi-silent and clinical.  Sure there was a lot of noise and at times the strong smell of diesel fuel could be quite overpowering but nothing quite like the steam workshops.  It was like being in a different world all together.  It is worth mentioning that diesel locos also have cow-catchers and diesel fuel is inflammable so the old fire and burning meat scenario was extant.

Rhodesia Railways General Electric DE2 having a chat with a 15th Class Garrett

Rhodesia Railways DE2's in tandem-late 1950's

Rhodesia Railways DE2's in tandem-late 1950's

It was about this time we started to get involved with a strange device known as a Cougar.  The Cougar was designed to ride shotgun for sensitive freight loads and passenger trains.  I do not think they were very successful but a good try by the Rhodesians to save lives and property.

Cougar

Ocassionally we would get a real fuck-up arrive in the Diesel workshops……something that had resulted from a Garrett and a DE2 saying howzit to each other on the same piece of track.  Now its quite fine to greet one another if you are passing on different tracks.  However it is quite a different matter if you are travelling in opposite directions on the same track.  It normally results in blood and train-tickets being spread far and wide across the Rhodesian bushvelt with much wailing and screaming.  Unfortunately people normally also die in this type of incident.  Not very nice at all and blokes like me would end up cutting the wrecked iron horses into moveable bits for transportation to the the knackers yard.  The picture below shows a Garrett 15th Class and a DE2 having a close encounter that resulted in severe damage and injury.

15th Class saying howzit to a DE2

15th Class saying howzit to a DE2

It would soon be time for me to move on and there were a number of things that needed to be done before I took a few weeks off prior to National Service.  There was equipment to be handed in, documents to sign, wills to be made out, and a place was needed to store my few belongings.  All in all I was not looking forward to leaving my little room in the Single Quarters after all.  It had become my comfort zone in more ways than one.  There were the farewells to Joe and Bella…..and expending the last of my meal coupons.  I never seemed to have much cash so there were no lavish farewells.  Just a few beers with boys, handshakes, sincere farewells, and instructions to look after myself.

On my last day at work I went over to see Mr Tyzack, said goodbye and shook his hand.  He was such a nice person, always giving encouragement at just the right time.  He told me the time would fly and I would be back before I knew it.  He was right about time flying, but as far as coming back he couldnt have been more wrong.

I walked out of the welding shop and up to the main gate, passed the steam locos being prepped for stripping, and short-cutted through the fitting shop with its spinning lathes and milling machines.  I was concious of eyes on me as I passed by and I wondered if I would ever see this place or any of these people again.

At the main gate I took my clock-card out of the holder and punched myself out.  I looked up at the sky…….it was starting to rain.